Conservation Notes: Save the Rain for a Sunny Day

01/25/2010 11:20

Water is essentail to life. Promote water conservation through ths use of rain barrels.

What is a rain barrel? A rain barrel is a system of collecting and storing water from the roofs of homes, barns and sheds. Rain barrels prevent water from attaching to soil or pollutants and being carried away and washed into storm drains. Reducing stormwater runoff reduces the amount of pesticides and fertilizer that impacts our water supply.

Rain barrels protect and conserve an important natural resource, water. Depending on the amount of rainfall and the size of a roof, a large amount of water can be collected and stored. For every inch of rainfall on a 1000 square feet area, equals an accumulation of 600 gallons of water with the use of a rain barrel. Imagine how much water would have been collected this past rainy year!

Collecting rainwater saves water for a future a future use. Rain barrels store and provide pure, natural water that is perfect for watering landscaping, gardens and washing cars and windows. For those living in town, the use of rainwater would have a great affect on the water bill.

In an effort to reduce stormwater runoff and promote water conservation, the Henry County Soil and Water Conservation District is conducting a rain barrel sale. The Henry County SWCD is accepting orders through Wednesday, March 31, 2010. Rain barrels may be collected at the Henry County SWCD on Wednesday, April 7, 2010 between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Information about rain barrels and a printable order form is available on the website at www.henrycountyilswcd.com. Order forms are also available at the Henry County SWCD office at 301 East North Street, in Cambridge. For more information regarding rain barrels, please call the office at 309.937.5263, extension 3 or e-mail Monica.Stevens@il.nacdnet.net. Stop in and check out the rain barrel on display for viewing at the Henry County Soil and Water Conservation District.

- Monica Stevens, Resource Conservationist

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